5 Creepy Board Games for Halloween Night

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Let me start by saying that Horror is not my preferred genre in any instance. I am easily scared and disturbed by even the slightest grotesque reference… However, in the spirit of Halloween which is now about a week away, I felt our TMA readers could enjoy a few suggestions incase they plan to ditch trick or treating for something different. No matter what the occasion may be, who doesn’t like to dive into a board game with friends over a few beers? I’ve done a little research and have collected a few well-reviewed, crowd pleasing horror inspired board games for you to consider. I know even I may make an exception if it could result in some spine-tingling fun.

1.City of Horror

city-of-horror
3-6 players | 90 minute playing time| Age 13+

City of Horror has been described as a backstabbing survival horror game by many different websites, reviewers and players. The basic idea is a group of zombies is invading your city and you are tasked with trying to survive the brutal assault.  The trick to doing so however, may cost the lives of your fellow opponents.
Players control multiple characters with various abilities- each with their own set of limitations in terms of advancement and action. The items you scavange throughout your explorations will essentially determine whether you will live or die.

2. Ghost Stories

ghost-stories

1-4 players | 60 minute playing time| Age 12+

Ghost Stories is a cooperative game where villagers protect themselves from an evil spirit of hell (Wu-Feng) and his army of ghosts. They are on a mission to acquire Wu-Feng’s ashes in hopes of bringing him back to life. Each player represents a monk who, in an effort of teamwork- collectively try to defeat waves of ghosts. Each turn brings about a new ghost with its own varying ability and motive- that will in theory be exorcised by the monk assuming all goes in their favor. There are many ways to lose but only one way to win- which is to defeat Wu-Feng, who will appear at the end of the game. It’s full of intrigue, luck and of course- spook!

 

3.Letters from Whitechapel

letters-from-whitechapel

2-6 players | 120 minute playing time | Age 13+

Set in dark and gloomy Whitechapel district of London in 1888- players will enter into the known murderous scene of Jack the Ripper. Amongst them, one will player represents Jack the Ripper who spends the course of the game trying to not get caught by fellow opponents- who play the police. It is very basic in the sense  that Jack follows a specific trail on the board vs. that of the police- but there are many opportunities for collision. The police must work together and strategize ways to capture Jack before the end of the game.

 

4. (Are you a) Werewolf?

are-you-a-werewolf

8-24 players | 60 minute playing time | Age 8+

Looking for a game of secrecy and intrigue? Look no further. Werewolf takes players to a village haunted by hungry werewolves. Each player is secretly assigned a role- villager, werewolf, or a special villager called a Seer. There is one moderator to help the game stay on course and controls the flow. The game is played in two parts- day vs. night. At night, the werewolves come together to decide which villager to kill and by day- that villager is revealed and out of the game. Werewolves will win the game if they succeed in securing an equal amount of villagers to the number of werewolves… but villagers can win if they manage to kill all the werewolves.

 

5. Dead Panic

dead-panic

2-6 players | 90 minute playing time | Age 13+

Players have entered the zombie apocalypse. Each person will take on the role of one of eight characters each with unique abilities and will work to defeat waves of the undead from a remote cabin in the middle of nowhere. Players are in the center of the board, with the undead creeping in from the edges. Survivors bring pieces of a radio to the group and call for help- but nobody is safe, even when rescue arrives- until they successfully get themselves out of the zombie ridden cabin.

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